Print

‘Friendly’ TransCanada Barrels Ahead!

Written by Monta Welch.

‘Friendly’ TransCanada Barrels Ahead!

In Spite of Obama’s Permit Denial, Proceeds with Eminent Domain Against American Farmers and Ranchers!

Take Action! Clicking here will automatically add your name to this petition to Transcanada CEO Russ Girling: "It is unconscionable that TransCanada is trying to confiscate land for the rejected Keystone XL Pipeline. Stop using eminent domain to sue landowners who don't want your dirty pipeline on their property." Automatically add your name: Act Now! Learn more about this campaign at CREDO Action | more than a network, a movement. Tell TransCanada: Stop seizing land for the rejected Keystone XL pipeline!!! 

The arrogance of TransCanada is shocking, even for an oil company. 

The company is threatening to seize the property of American landowners and start construction of its Keystone XL pipeline — even though President Obama last month rejected the permit to build. 

Tell TransCanada: Stop using eminent domain to confiscate private property for the rejected Keystone XL Pipeline. Click here to automatically sign the petition. 

The pipeline path includes the 600 acre working farm that Julia Trigg Crawford's grandfather bought in 1948, on the Texas Oklahoma border, where the Red River meets Bois d'Arc Creek, which waters the farm. Fearing for the safety of her farm and it's water source, Julia Trigg rejected TransCanada's offer to buy an easement on her land. TransCanada announced it was seizing her land under eminent domain and would begin digging, but Julia won a temporary restraining order, 1) at least until this Friday, when the court will hear the case challenging TransCanada's status as a "common carrier" under Texas law. It's bad enough that TransCanada expects landowners like Julia Trigg to accept permanent damage to their land and possible oil spills. But it's beyond arrogant for this foreign oil company to trample on private property rights and start construction on a project whose permit has just been denied! 

Under eminent domain, the government can force landowners to accept monetary payment for the use of their land for certain public-good projects like highways and railroads. Of course, TransCanada's massive fuse to the carbon bomb of the tar sands shouldn't qualify as one of these projects — it does great harm and only helps the profits of a foreign corporation, with the bitumen oil planned for export to non-domestic shores. But regardless, the company doesn't even have the permit to build it, because the White House just rejected their application. But that hasn't stopped TransCanada. According to The New York Times, the company has at least 34 eminent domain actions against landowners in Texas, and 22 in South Dakota. 2) And their threats to landowners in Nebraska 3) helped spark massive public opposition and a special legislative session that were key in the decision to consider a different route. Many of these landowners are being sued by the company, and told that if they don't take the small monetary offering — sometimes less than $10,000 in exchange for the permanent damage to their land, and huge risk of spills — their land will be condemned and TransCanada will seize the easement. 

Julia Trigg and others are fighting back and doing everything they can to oppose TransCanada's land grab. Everyone from environmentalists to Tea Partiers in Texas are showing their support for Americans' property rights. 4) As these court challenges unfold, we need to build pressure against TransCanada and spread the word about their reprehensible tactics. Click below to automatically sign the petition: 

Elijah Zarlin, Campaign Manager CREDO Action from Working Assets 

1. " Keystone XL Pipeline: Texas Farmer Wins Temporary Restraining Order Against TransCanada," Huffington Post, February 14, 2012
2. " Eminent Domain Fight Has a Canadian Twist," New York Times, October 17th, 2011
3. " TransCanada Keystone XL Eminent Domain Threat Letter," Dirty Oil Sands
4. " Texans rally against Keystone XL oil pipeline easement," LA Times, February 17, 2012